Products

Designed and Built in America

AFI equipment is based on research completed at the University of Nebraska and designed almost entirely by farm kids from Nebraska. We have strived to integrate as many American made components into AFI equipment as possible, from brass fittings to toolbars. Our three largest suppliers and manufacturers are based within an hour of our home base of Lincoln, NE.

Innovation at AFI

AFI has developed a series of tractor mounted flame weeding equipment. The revolutionary row crop flamer provides organic farmers a much needed tool to control weeds within crop rows and provides a feasible weed control method during wet conditions. We quickly realized that most of the flame weeding equipment on the market was still using 1950s technology. Tremendous versatility is a part of its design. Compared with existing flaming equipment that falls short in one aspect or another, AFI has put together the complete package in its flame weeding equipment through the following key innovations: hood technology (patent pending), efficient vaporizer/torch unit (patent pending), electronic ignition and flame detection (patent pending), and treatment recipes for individual crops.

Product Line

Treatment capacity in acres per day is based on 8 hours of treatment time at an average travel speed of 4 mph. Depending on the propane dose (banded or full flaming), the tank/s will need to be refueled 1-3 times.

2-Row

Overall Machine Width – 93” (7’ 9”)

Row Spacing – 30”, 36”, or 38”

Tank Size – 74 or 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 64 or 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt.

5

1,250 lb (74 wgal)

5

1,841 lb (250 wgal)

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

7’9” x 4’6” x 5’6”

Treatment Capacity: 20 acres per day

4-Row

Overall Machine Width – 168” (14’)

Row Spacing – 30”, 36”, or 38”

Tank Size – 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt. – 2,400 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

14’0” x 4’6” x 6’8”

Treatment Capacity: 40 acres per day

6-Row Narrow (Rigid or Folding Toolbar)

Overall Machine Width – 192” (16’)

Optional Folded Width – 132” (11’)

Row Spacing – 30”

Individual Row Profiling

Tank Size – 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt. – 3,450 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

16’ x 7’ x 8’

Treatment Capacity: 60 acres per day

6-Row Wide (Folding Toolbar)

Overall Machine Width – 300” (25’)

Folded Width – 176” (14’ 8”)

Row Spacing – 36”

Individual Row Profiling

Tank Size – 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt. – 4,060 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

25’ x 7’ x 8’ (unfolded)

5

15’ x 7’ x 9’7” (folded)

Treatment Capacity: 70 acres per day

8-Row (Folding Toolbar)

Overall Machine Width – 300” (25’)

Folded Width – 176” (14’ 8”)

Row Spacing – 30” or 36”

Individual Row Profiling

Tank Size – 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt. – 4,370 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

25’ x 7’ x 8’ (unfolded)

5

15’ x 7’ x 9’7” (folded)

Treatment Capacity: 80 acres per day

12-Row (Folding Toolbar)

Overall Machine Width – 372” (31’)

Folded Width – 224” (18’ 8”)

Row Spacing – 30”

Individual Row Profiling

Lift-Assist Wheels (Optional)

Tank Size – 2 x 250 wgal

Total Propane Capacity – 2 x 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt – 7,900 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

31’ x 7’ x 8’ (unfolded)

5

18’8” x 7’ x 8’8” (folded)

Treatment Capacity: 120 acres per day

16-Row (Double Folding Toolbar)

Overall Machine Width – 492” (41’)

Folded Width – 224” (18’ 8”)

Row Spacing – 30”

Individual Row Profiling

Lift-Assist Wheels (Optional)

Tank Size – 2 x 250 wgal

Tank Propane Capacity – 2 x 200 gal

Fully Fueled Wt. – 9,300 lb

Transport dimensions (WxDxH):

5

41’ x 7’ x 8’ (unfolded)

5

33’8” x 7’ x 8’ (outer wings folded)

Treatment Capacity: 160 acres per day

AFI innovations offer farmers numerous benefits:

1. Safety First

the equipment is designed with SAFETY as the highest priority. AFI’s hood technology makes flaming treatments safer and more consistent. The importance of safety cannot be stressed enough when dealing with flammable propane and the high temperatures of combustion. Unprotected from the chaotic effects of wind, flaming equipment utilizing just open torches can be dangerous. Nothing stops the wind from carrying the hot gases out of the treatment zone and into possibly dangerous locations where equipment could be damaged or an operator could be burned. Flaming hoods aid tremendously in keeping the hot gases contained and away from the equipment, the operator, and the crop. In addition to our hood technology, AFI propane tanks that are rated for the rough mobile use they will see during operation and our electronic ignition system and flame detection keep a safe distance between you and the flames. AFI equipment was designed to keep you safe.

2. Specially designed Hoods

Better control of the heat means better more consistent treatment results. AFI’s hood technology does just that, especially in windy conditions. First, a higher quality, more consistent weed control is achieved. Ascard (1995a) addressed inconsistent weed control as another limitation of flaming with open torch equipment, and wind is the major reason behind the inconsistent weed control when open torches are used. Wind can wreak havoc on the effectiveness of a flaming treatment. It can evacuate the heat out of the treatment zone, resulting in little damage to the weeds and a failed treatment. Wind is an element of the weather that is frequently encountered in the field, and in order to hit the right treatment timing, AFI’s hood technology allows for moderate winds (up to 15 mph) to be tolerated. Second, increased energy efficiency is also realized. Again, open torch technology ceases control of the hot combustion gases once they exit the torch. AFI’s hood technology and robust torches complement each other, reducing heat losses from the combustion gases and providing longer exposure times at higher temperatures. With the increase in energy efficiency, the same level of weed control can be obtained with less fuel (i.e. lower treatment cost/acre).

3. Robust Torches

Any system based on burning a fuel, like a flame weeding torch, must have excellent combustion stability in order to perform reliably. Combustion stability in flame weeding equates to torches that very rarely flame out during operation, and we are proud of the excellent stability we have built into AFI torches. An unusual amount of frustration comes from operating a flamer that has unstable torches that randomly extinguish themselves, but you do not have to worry about that with AFI equipment. Once an AFI torch is ignited, it is not going to extinguish until the operator switches it off or it runs out of fuel. In addition to the excellent combustion stability, AFI torches have proven to be relatively low maintenance, and an easy, tool-less adjustment switches them between the banded and full flaming configurations.

4. Electronic Ignition & flame detection

Remote electronic ignition of each torch is the only safe way to ignite flame weeding torches. Combine that with the fact that propane flames are often not visible in daylight hours, AFI’s electronic ignition and flame detection system make it much safer and easier to operate a flamer. No longer does the farmer need to continue the dangerous practice of manually lighting all of the torches. Nobody likes getting their arm hair singed. Manual ignition is simply unacceptable. Remote ignition also improves the process of turning around in the end-rows of the field. The flames can simply be paused for the short turnaround period and quickly reignited for the next pass. The low-pressure “pilot” flame mode used on so many flamers is either susceptible to extinguishing from a gust of wind (pilot pressure set too low) or it is igniting your buffer strips or windbreak on fire (pilot pressure set too high). As an operator with an AFI flamer, you can simply turn the flames on or off at the flip of a switch. Ignition controls will also monitor the torches through flame detection, and reignite a torch if it extinguishes during a treatment. If a torch cannot be reignited, the controls will simultaneously shut down the trouble row and alert the farmer about the issue.

5. Flame Weeding Manual

You no longer have to guess how to use your flame weeder or what results you will see. The flame weeding manual contains over 6 years of research studies on how to safely and effectively use flaming in common row crops like corn and soybeans. It also spells out what weeds are more difficult to control and which ones are easily managed with flame weeding. In addition, AFI’s operator’s manual includes recommended equipment configurations paired with propane dose tables that provide the pressure settings and tractor speeds required to apply a full range of doses for effective flame weeding.

6. Convenience & Flexibility

Full season flaming capabilities are built into every AFI flamer, and a good amount of design work has been applied towards making the adjustments between all of those configurations as quick and convenient as possible. For example, late flaming treatments in taller corn and soybean crops are managed through adjustable width hood panels. AFI’s hoods can be reconfigured to create a gap between the hood panels. Going from the early season, closed position to a narrower width is as simple as twisting off a couple wing nuts and adjusting the extension panels. The result is a gap that allows those taller crops to safely flow through while the hoods are still able to keep the heat down near the ground where you need it. The gap can vary from 4-10 inches, and similar to setting cultivator sweeps, how tight you set the hood gap depends on how comfortable you are with driving the tractor through the field. Lastly, integrated parking stands and category 2-3 point hitch compatibility further add to the convenience of AFI equipment.

7. Ecological Weed Control

AFI equipment provides farmers a sustainable and ecological tool for weed control. Certified organic farmers are not the only group that can benefit from AFI technology. Herbicide resistance developing in the new “super weeds” has only made chemical-based weed management even more environmentally unfriendly and unsustainable. AFI flame weeders can provide a cost-effective solution to those conventional farmers that are fed up with chemical weed control.

Our product works on mutliple types of crops.

 AFI flamers can either complement existing mechanical weed control methods (e.g. rotary hoeing and cultivation), or work independently. Looking at crop applications, the current focus is corn and soybeans. However, successful preliminary testing has been completed in sunflower and sorghum (silage), and given simple modifications (i.e. hood width), the AFI flamer could be used in many other crops (e.g. alfalfa [hay], cotton, dry edible beans). Following AFI’s plan, the farmer will be provided with recipes for treatment of various crops and will know what to expect after flaming treatment is applied.

Does flaming treatment harm overall yield?

Looking at what is to be expected from a treatment, the most frequently asked question is: will the flaming treatment harm my yield? The answer is no, flaming with AFI equipment and using our recommended approach will not harm your crop yield. In fact, adding an AFI flame weeder to your weed management toolbox will more likely improve your yield, significantly, through improved weed control. Field testing has verified successful weed control in the following agronomic crops: corn, soybeans, sorghum, and sunflower. Our flamers control weeds within the crop row, which are impossible to remove through mechanical cultivation, directly protecting crop yield and resulting in up to $450 per acre in additional revenues. We have observed this at many experimental fields of the University of Nebraska, and at many organic farms that have been using AFI flamers over the last few years. This extra income from increased yield by flame weeding was also confirmed independently by many organic farmers that regularly attend Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) conferences held annually in La Crosse, WI.

Videos

4-Row

8-Row

12-Row

16-Row